Tuesday, May 16, 2017

Austin Chalk - Log Analyis Comparison


With EOG's recent leap over to Louisiana to test their new Austin Chalk frac design, it might be beneficial to compare the log analysis from each area.  All three areas compared below have a plethora of historical vertical wells to use for analysis.

EOG's recent "monster" Austin Chalk wells are located in the Karnes Trough of Karnes County, Texas. 

EOG Resources - Austin Chalk competions - Karnes County, Texas
The figures below present a log analysis comparison using Exxon's Passey Log Method which presents a log-calculated total organic carbon (TOC) value. This method has been proven to work across most of the unconventional plays in the U.S.

For an overview of the method, here's an excellent paper from Thomas Bowman:
http://www.searchanddiscovery.com/pdfz/documents/2010/110128bowman/ndx_bowman.pdf.html

EOG has also been leasing on the county line between Fayette and Lavaca Counties. The figures below compare three wells from Karnes, Fayette/Lavaca, and Avoyelles Parish. 

For comparison, a Passey thickness (DLogR > 1.0) and DLogR "mean" were calculated.  Higher DLogR indicates higher TOC.  The mean DLogR values range from 1.09-1.26 with Avoyelles being the highest at 1.26. Thicknesses range from 174'-187' with Karnes County being the highest.

As more wells are drilled, a tighter calibration can be made.





4 comments:

  1. Hi Kirk,
    Does this trend (Austin Chalk) extend into Mississippi? I recalled that a few years back some company drilled three wells looking for the Chalk below Natchez?
    CBell

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    Replies
    1. CB,it's good to hear from you. Yes the Austin Chalk occurs in Mississippi. The question remains whether it has the right "geological formula" there.

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    2. Yes, Energy XXI drilled some wells in Adams County. They were unsuccessful

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  2. Thanks for responding, Kirk. I am anxious to hear how EOG does in Avoyelles Parish. Good to know your blog is still going.
    Best regards

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